YoPRO

Product review: YoPRO high protein yoghurt

YoPRO is one of the latest additions to the ever-growing yoghurt section of most supermarkets. As I mentioned in my Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter review, at the moment many consumers are looking for high protein products to suit their lifestyles. While all yoghurts are a source of complete protein, YoPRO’s selling point is the high content of protein per serve (15g-17g) achieved by the straining step during production.

Yopro

What’s in YoPRO?

Apart from milk and live yoghurt cultures, YoPRO also contains lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose), making it suitable for people with lactose intolerance. All the fruit flavours (mango, passionfruit, strawberry, blueberry) contain actual fruit purée and all flavours (except for plain) are lightly sweetened with stevia. There are a few more ingredients in the flavoured varieties but nothing nasty as you can see in below (for the flavours I tried):

  • Plain: fresh milk, enzyme (lactase), live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus)
  • Vanilla: fresh milk, water, rice starch, enzyme (lactase), lemon pulp, natural flavours, live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus), stevia leaf extract, vanilla bean (0.012%), sea salt, natural colour (caramel), milk minerals
  • Passionfruit: fresh milk, passion fruit purée (5%), rice starch, enzyme (lactase), milk minerals, live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus), natural flavours, stevia leaf extract, sea salt
  • Blueberry: fresh milk, blueberry purée (5%), rice starch, enzyme (lactase), black carrot and blackcurrant concentrate, lemon pulp, live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus), stevia leaf extract, natural flavours, milk minerals, sea salt

And these are the nutritional panels (for the flavours I tried):

Plain:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 99 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 64mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 6.7g 2%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.7g
Protein 17g 34%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Vanilla:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 95 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 66mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 7.4g 2%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.1g
Protein 15.2g 30%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Passionfruit:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 96 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 67mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 7.5g 3%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.6g
Protein 15.4g 31%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Blueberry:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 97 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 66mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 8.0g 3%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.9g
Protein 15.2g 30%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

As you may know, yoghurt’s nutritional contributions also include calcium and probiotics. You can find more information about the health benefits of dairy in this article I wrote a while ago.

What about the taste and texture?

The reason YoPRO is high in protein is that it is strained further than other yoghurts, which results in a thicker, creamier product. Not as thick and creamy as our favourite yoghurt, but close enough.

Taste-wise, if you’re used to the sugary desserts labelled as “yoghurt”, you will probably find YoPRO’s flavour too mild. If, on the other hand, you regularly consume unsweetened plain yoghurt (i.e. real yoghurt), there’s a good chance you enjoy YoPRO in its plain and flavoured versions.

For more information head to YoPRO’s website.

Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter

Product review: Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter

Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter is the new awesome spread from the makers of awesome spreads. Their regular peanut butters (smooth, crunchy, dark roasted smooth and dark roasted crunchy) are among my favourites, as well as their other spreads. Yes, they can be a bit more expensive than other peanut butters but they tick all the boxes ingredients- and taste-wise.

The new Protein+ range has entered the market riding the wave of high protein diets popularity. The three varieties, Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter, Mayver’s Protein+ with Hemp Seeds Peanut Butter, and Mayver’s Protein+ with Super Seeds Peanut Butter, follow the brand’s philosophy of minimal ingredients lists, without any added oil or sugar.

Where does the Protein+ come from?

The three flavours have added peanut flour to achieve extra protein without added fat, plus seeds in the case of the hemp and super seeds varieties. Check out the ingredients lists below:

Mayvers protein peanut butter

  • Natural: roasted peanuts, peanut flour & salt
  • Hemp: peanuts, peanut flour, hemp seeds (5%) & salt
  • Super Seeds: peanuts, peanut flour, (chia seeds, linseeds, sunflower seeds, pepitas, quinoa) (5%) & salt

And these are the nutritional panels:

Natural:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 20g
Servings Per Container 19

Amount Per Serving
Calories 97.1 Calories from Fat 75.6
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8.4g 13%
Saturated Fat 1.1g 6%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 79mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 2.6g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1.8g 7%
Sugars 1.4g
Protein 6.4g 13%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Hemp:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 20g
Servings Per Container 19

Amount Per Serving
Calories 97.5 Calories from Fat 76.5
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8.5g 13%
Saturated Fat 1.1g 6%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 75mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 3.2g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1.8g 7%
Sugars 1.2g
Protein 6.4g 13%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Super seeds:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 20g
Servings Per Container 19

Amount Per Serving
Calories 96.7 Calories from Fat 75.6
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8.4g 13%
Saturated Fat 1.0g 5%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 75mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 2.7g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1.9g 8%
Sugars 1.3g
Protein 6.4g 13%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

What about the taste and texture?

Taste-wise my favourite is the natural flavour, followed by the super seeds, followed by the hemp. Nothing wrong with any of the flavours, it’s just a matter of personal preference.

While not super thick, these peanut butters are definitely on the thicker side and the mouthfeel can be a bit gritty, particularly in the natural flavour. If smooth silky peanut butter is your thing, stick to the regular smooth options.

Can I use this peanut butter in recipes?

Absolutely. I made a test batch (recipe coming soon) of bliss balls with the natural PB and it worked perfectly.

You can find more information in the following links:
Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter
Mayver’s Protein+ with Hemp Seeds Peanut Butter
Mayver’s Protein+ with Super Seeds Peanut Butter

Primal Kitchen chipotle lime mayo

Product review: Primal Kitchen chipotle lime mayo

It’s been a few weeks since I opened my jar of Primal Kitchen mayo and I’m happy to report that its texture and flavour remain untouched. This is why I decided to try Primal Kitchen chipotle lime mayo.

What is in Primal Kitchen chipotle lime mayo?

Just like the original version, try the chipotle lime mayo is all natural, sugar/soy/canola/dairy/gluten/grain-free, etc. The ingredients list is relatively short and all of them are recognisable as “food”: avocado oil, organic cage-free eggs, organic cage-free egg yolks, organic vinegar, water, sea salt, organic lime juice concentrate, chipotle powder, lime granules, organic garlic powder, organic rosemary extract.

Primal Kitchen chipotle lime mayo

I enjoyed both the creaminess and taste of this mayo. It’s not too spicy but it does have a bit of heat that pairs well with the smokey chipotle and the tangy lime.

Primal Kitchen chipotle lime mayo

What is chipotle?

Chipotle is a smoked dried jalapeño chilli. It’s one of my favourites because it’s not super hot and imparts a nice flavour to many foods. You’ll find it most often in hot sauces and, more recently, in mayonnaise. In a sense, chipotle mayo is the new(er) aioli.

Why avocado oil?

(This is copy-paste from my previous Primal Kitchen mayo review). Avocado oil, like olive oil, is high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). There is evidence to suggest that MUFAs are beneficial for cardiovascular and metabolic health, and that they are more stable than polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). I’ll be writing a more in-depth post about this in the future.

Bottom line

If you like flavoured mayonnaise, and especially if you enjoy spicy flavours and Tex-Mex cuisine, this is a good product to try. As far as I know, it is only available online from US stores such as iHerb.com.

Future Whey

Product review: Future Whey

Future Whey is a newish sports supplement. I decided to try it mainly because I got a free sample, but also because the packaging got me intrigued. It looks like detergent. It looks like a prank product. It is not.

The name implies this is a whey powder product, but it claims to be dairy-free – this is confusing. Future Whey is really a collection of amino-acids, including the branched-chain amino acids or BCAAs, which are the ones preferentially taken up by muscle cells.

What is in Future Whey?

From the website: essential amino acid blend (L Leucine, L Threonine, L Valine, L Isoleucine, L Lysine, L Methionine, L Phenylalanine, L Histidine, L tryptophan), L Glutamine, L Glycine, L Alanine, flavouring, L Tyrosine, malitol, citrulline malate, citric acid, L Taurine, sweetener (sucralose).

I’m not sold on the “flavouring” and sweeteners (malitol and sucralose) but I guess they have to make it taste good somehow. The two currently available (and very unorthodox) flavours are cola and lemonade.

Future Whey - back

(Yes, “glutamine” is misspelled)

From the nutrition panel:
Per Serve (25g)
Energy (kj): 387
Protein (g): 22.8
Carbohydrates (g): 0
– Sugars (g): 0
Fats (g): 0
– Saturated (g): 0
Sodium (mg): 0

The taste test

Given I only tried one serving of the product, I can only comment on taste and not results. My sample was lemonade flavour. They suggest taking it with sparkling water but I drank it with room temperature tap water. It was not horrible but a) it did not taste like lemonade to me and b) it was a bit salty. Not that this bothers me, but just FYI.

Future Whey or regular whey?

I think this comes to individual preferences and results. Personally, I am not 100% comfortable with not knowing the source of the ingredients in the supplements I consume. Plus, I have no gut or moral issues with good quality whey protein. In addition, there is evidence that the cysteine content in whey protein may increase glutathione levels in the body (glutathione is a powerful antioxidant). For all of those reasons, I choose whey over Future Whey.

Want to learn more?

Head to Bulk Nutrient’s website.

Primal Kitchen mayonnaise

Product review: Primal Kitchen mayo

I’m a big proponent of eating less processed foods, which means making more stuff at home. As such, I’ve been making mayonnaise regularly at home for the past several years, but now that my husband is away the mayo stays in the fridge long enough to turn into a weird texture. I’m not entirely sure what’s going on at a chemical level but I do know I enjoy creamy mayo better.

Given that a lot of food manufacturing companies have jumped on the health claim bandwagon I’m always hopeful I will find a jarred mayonnaise that will contain minimally processed ingredients. Unfortunately, this hasn’t been the case. The closest I’ve found was an olive oil-containing mayonnaise sold at the farmers markets by an olive farm, which also contained canola oil. I know there is a health aura surrounding canola oil, but I prefer consuming oils that do not undergo such extensive processing.

What is wrong with the mayonnaise you can find at the supermarket?

To answer this question we need to go back to basics: What is mayonnaise anyway?

  • a dressing made chiefly of egg yolks, vegetable oils, and vinegar or lemon juice (Merriam-Webster dictionary)
  • a thick, white sauce made from oil, vinegar, and the yellow part of eggs, usually eaten cold (Cambridge dictionary)
  • a thick creamy dressing consisting of egg yolks beaten with oil and vinegar and seasoned (Oxford dictionary)

In contrast, have a look at the ingredients lists below.

MayonnaiseMayonnaiseMayonnaise
Mayonnaise
Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise
MayonnaiseMayonnaiseMayonnaise
Mayonnaise
Mayonnaise
Mayonnaise
MayonnaiseMayonnaiseMayonnaise

I did a bit of number crunching and, out of the 15 mayonnaise products pictured above, most contained extra ingredients. For example:

  • 7 used sunflower oil, 5 canola oil, 2 rapeseed, soybean or vegetable oil
  • 13 contained water
  • 11 contained whole eggs, 3 contained egg yolks and 1 contained liquid whole egg and liquid egg yolks (I’m guessing these come in a tetrapack and not in a shell)
  • 10 did not specify which vinegar they contained, 5 said it was white vinegar and 1 also had malt vinegar
  • 13 contained sugar and 2 corn syrup
  • 4 contained preservative (385 or 202)
  • 6 contained antioxidant (304, 307b, 320 or 385)
  • 2 contained stabilisers (412 or 415)
  • 2 contained corn starch (modified or otherwise)
  • 15 contained thickeners (vegetable gum [405, 415], 425, 1403, 1422, 1442, 1450, corn starch, modified corn starch)
  • 1 contained cream powder
  • 1 contained citrus fibre
  • 1 contained lemon oil
  • 5 contained food acid (citric acid = 330) or acidity regulator
  • 7 contained colour (101, 160a, 171 or carotenes)
  • 1 contained whey protein concentrate (what for??)
  • 9 contained mustard, 1 contained mustard flour (aka mustard powder, I guess), and 1 contained natural mustard flavouring, whatever that is
  • All of them contained some sort of seasoning, which included (from the specific to the highly ambiguous): garlic, paprika, natural paprika extract, rosemary extract, natural flavour extract, flavour, spices, spice extract, herb extract, vegetable powder.

I realise it’s a bit of a blasphemy in some circles to ship stuff from far away but I do it when I can’t find what I want locally. This is why I decided to buy Primal Kitchen mayo via iHerb.com.

The label is adorned with a few health claims, such as “all natural ingredients”, “sugar free”, “soy & canola free”, “dairy free”, “gluten & grain free”. The product also is certified gluten free (by US standards), certified Paleo, Whole 30 approved and Non GMO Project Verified. All of these mostly appeal to the paleo/primal crowd and would probably make other circles very angry. Other people might not care. Anyway, the ingredients list is short and sweet: avocado oil, organic cage-free eggs, organic cage-free egg yolks, organic vinegar (from non-GMO beets), sea salt, organic rosemary extract.

Primal Kitchen mayo

The mayo is super creamy and I quite liked the taste. The colour is quite whiter than what I get when I make mayo with avocado oil, not sure why.

Primal Kitchen mayo

Why avocado oil?

Avocado oil, like olive oil, is high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). There is evidence to suggest that MUFAs are beneficial for cardiovascular and metabolic health, and that they are more stable than polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). I’ll be writing a more in-depth post about this in the future.

Bottom line

I’m not suggesting everyone goes online and orders mayonnaise made by this crazy primal guy. It’s just an option for people looking for alternatives to the current mayonnaise landscape and a wish to have a similar product made locally.

Product review: Pili nuts

I first heard about pili nuts a couple of years ago. These nuts hail from the Philippines and are particularly sought after by people following a low-carb or keto diet, due to its high content of fat and low content of carbohydrate. They’re pretty hard to come by, especially in Australia. Luckily for me, a teammate recently went to the Philippines and brought me a bag of plain roasted ones (she knows me well).

Pili nuts

The nuts look like giant almond slivers and have a soft, buttery and crumbly texture. They are very mild in flavour so you might want to shake some sea salt on them before trying them.

The table below shows nutrition information for most nuts (raw, from the Australian food nutrient database) and pili nuts (dry roasted, from the package and dried, from the USDA database).

Food Name Energy, with dietary fibre (kJ)

Protein (g)

Total fat (g)

Carbohydrate (g)

Total sugars (g)

Dietary fibre (g)
Almonds 2578 21 55.6 6.4 3.9 7.4
Brazil nuts 2886 14.4 68.5 2.4 2.1 8.5
Cashews 2544 17 49.2 23.1 5.5 5.9
Chestnuts 731 2.5 0.7 32.1 3.3 14.9
Hazelnuts 2689 14.8 61.4 5.1 4.4 10.4
Macadamias 3018 9.2 74 4.5 4.5 6.4
Peanuts 2376 24.7 47.1 8.9 5.1 8.2
Pecan 2973 9.8 71.9 4.9 4.3 8.4
Pili nuts Package: 3068
USDA: 3008
13.3
10.8
70.0
79.6
10.0
4.0
0
N/A
0
N/A
Pine nuts 2925 13 70 4.5 3.4 5.1
Pistachios 2542 19.7 50.6 15.8 5.9 9
Walnuts 2904 14.4 69.2 3 2.7 6.4

Not on the table, but pili nuts do seem to contain a decent amount of calcium and monounsaturated fats (compared to other nuts). If you have easy access to plain, dry roasted pili nuts, give them a go, they might be your cup of tea.

Pili nuts

Product review: Macro Natural Nut Mix

Macro Natural Mixed Nuts

Woolies has recently launched a snack pack called Macro Natural Nut Mix. The bag contains 5 single-serve packs 5 and costs $3.99, making a convenient and reasonably-priced snack. Sadly, convenience also means extra packaging.

Each pack contains 30g of nuts (almonds, blanched peanuts, walnuts and cashews), which is the recommended serving size in the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Note that the nuts are either raw or blanched and unsalted, making them healthier than the roasted and/or flavoured varieties.

Nuts contain healthy fats (mainly monounsaturated and some polyunsaturated fatty acids), as well as some protein and fibre. They also contain appreciable amounts of micronutrients such as vitamin E, folate, magnesium, calcium, and selenium. When tolerated, nuts should be consumed regularly in sensible amounts as part of a healthy diet. I prefer to freeze nuts for texture and to help protect the fats from going rancid.

Each serve provides:
Energy: 777kJ
Protein: 6.7g
Fat 16.5g
Saturated 1.7g
Carbohydrate 2.0g
– Sugars 1.6g
Fibre 2.5g

For more information about the health benefits of nuts, visit Nuts For Life.

Product review: Huon Salmon to Go Deli Bites

Huon, the well-known Tasmanian salmon producer, has launched a new line of ready-to-eat products called Salmon to Go.

Huon Salmon Bites

I bought a bag of Deli Bites, hot smoked natural flavour, which only contains salmon, salt and natural wood smoke. Other hot smoked options are blackened spice, lemon pepper and sweet chilli, and there is also a cold smoked one. The product’s selling point is convenience, as it can be easily added to pastas, salads or pizza, as suggested on the package. The bag contains 250g of salmon, which at $6 is significantly cheaper than other smoked salmon products. In my opinion, this is a clever way of using those bits and pieces that would perhaps otherwise end as food waste.

Huon Salmon Bites

This product is a great source of protein and healthy omega-3 fatty acids:
Protein: 26.3g
Fat 9.4g
– saturated 2.1g
– polyunsaturated 2.5g
   omega-3 1.4g
    EPA 441.8mg
    DHA 639.2mg
   omega-6 1.1g
– monounsaturated 4.3g
– trans 0.1g

Huon Salmon to Go Deli Bites are available in the refrigerated section of major supermarkets.

To learn more about this product visit Huon’s website.

Hart and Soul cup soups

Product review: Hart and Soul cup soups

I wrote a product review for the nutrition site Foodwatch, ran by dietitian extraordinaire Catherine Saxelby. As all my reviews, this is a product I discovered while looking for a convenient, yet not overly processed source of nourishment. At the time, I was doing placement in Orange and I wasn’t able to cook every day. These soups turned out to be a perfect addition to my weekday lunches, particularly because it was freezing cold.

To read the full review, click here.

San Remo pulse pasta

Product review: San Remo pulse pasta

I came across San Remo pulse pasta at the Gluten Free Expo a few weeks ago. Even though I very rarely eat pasta (in fact I never buy or cook it because I prefer using vegetables as the vehicle for sauces), these caught my eye because they are not just an empty source of refined carbohydrate, but actually pack some nutrition. Because they are only or mostly made from pulses, they are higher in protein, lower in carbs and higher in fibre than regular pasta.

They come in three shapes: spaghetti, penne and fusilli. The spaghetti and penne are made out of equal parts of pea, chickpea, borlotti bean and lentil flour. The recommended serve is 125g (half a pack), which I think was a bit too much. Our serves were about 80-85g. The macros per serve for these are:
Protein: 28.8g
Fat 3.8g 3.0g
– saturated 0.5g
Carbohydrates 57.5g
– sugars 3.8g

The fusilli is made of chickpea flour (75%) and potato starch. The recommended serve is also 125 g and these are the macros per serve:
Protein: 22.5g
Fat 4.4g
– saturated 0.6g
Carbohydrates 71.3g
– sugars 2.8g

I tried the pasta with three recipes that remind me of my childhood: tallarín saltado de pollo criollo, tallarines blancos con atún and tallarines verdes.

Tallarín saltado de pollo criollo

Tallarines blancos con atún

Tallarines verdes

I was very pleased with the flavour and texture of the three shapes. They reminded me of whole wheat pasta in both fronts but felt a lot better digestion-wise. I found the flavour did not overpower the main ingredients in either of the dishes.

San Remo pulse pasta is available in major supermarkets. I recommend you give it a go whether or not you’re sensitive to gluten, the nutritional value is worth it.

Visit the following link for more information about San Remo gluten free pasta, including the pulse varieties.