Gastrophysics

Book review: Gastrophysics (Charles Spence)

Gastrophysics: The New Science of Eating is a recently published book by British experimental psychologist Charles Spence. I had heard about his work in a few food podcasts I listen to, particularly his experiments with “sonic seasoning” – the effect that sound has on taste and texture perception.

The introduction was written by British celebrity chef Heston Blumenthal of The Fat Duck, with whom Spence has collaborated for a number of years. This fact certainly gives the author more credibility than the Ig Nobel Prize he won in 2008 for his sonic seasoning research on potato chips.

What is gastrophysics?

As described by the author in chapter one, gastrophysics is where gastronomy meets psychophysics (i.e. the scientific study of perception). As we know, we perceive things through our senses, and this is how the book starts.

The book

Chapters 1-5 cover the senses: taste, smell, sight, sound and touch. The author explains how our perception of food comes from multiple sensory cues, not just flavour. Things that affect our willingness to eat a particular food and our perception of it include colour, a food’s name, genetic predisposition to taste certain substances, scents, shapes, size of the serving vessel, sound of packaging, texture and weight of the cutlery, etc.

The rest of the book builds on how those sensory cues are affected or applied to particular situations. ‘The atmospheric meal’ explains how ambience affects our dining behaviour and experience. ‘Social dining’ explores the current trend of eating alone vs. with others, and how that can modify what and how much we eat. ‘Airline food’ explains why it is (or it seems to be) so bad and what can be done to make it less bad. ‘The meal remembered’ reminds us that experiences are more memorable than tastes.

‘The personalised meal’ is all about our preference for personalisation (the simplest example being seasoning our food on the table) and how this can be used by businesses to target consumers. ‘The experiential meal’ narrates different approaches of delivering multisensory experiences in fine dining establishments, including theatrical serving, storytelling, music, magic, opera, etc. ‘Digital dining’ questions the benefits of digital menus, digital plating (i.e. plating on tablets), 3D food printing, etc. ‘Back to the futurists’ contrasts the 1930s Italian futurists movement with today’s dining scape.

Book wrap-up

Even though the bulk of the book can be viewed as a marketing tool for restaurateurs, the author also gives recommendations that can be used in ordinary life, particularly if one is interested in eating healthier. Thus, Spence ends the book with the following recommendations for eating healthy, applying some of the lessons learned from research:

  1. Eat less
  2. Hide junk food
  3. For middle-aged and older adults: drink lots of water before meals to fill you up
  4. Eat in front of a mirror to decrease consumption of junk food, eat slowly and mindfully
  5. The more food sensations (i.e. the least processed the food), the better
  6. Eat from small plates
  7. Eat from heavy bowls without rims, held in your hands (to trick you into thinking there is more food)
  8. Use red plateware to trigger avoidance
  9. Eat using chopsticks or with your non-dominant hand or using small cutlery to make it more difficult to get food in your mouth
Mother's Day

Happy Mother’s Day!

Just a quick note to say Happy Mother’s Day to all those strong, smart, loving, amazing women a.k.a. mums.

Special thanks to the two women who influenced me the most when it comes to food and cooking: my mum and her mum. I will never forget watching Peruvian celebrity chef Teresa Ocampo on the TV with my grandma. She also taught me how to make pancakes and how to love offal, thanks to her superb cooking skills. She passed away when I was 9.

Mum inspired my interest in trying new recipes and eating out. She is a wonderful and consistent cook, even though she never measures ingredients. I have adapted some of her recipes and published them on the blog (see below). Needless to say, they taste better when mum makes them.

I’m glad this year my mum will spend Mother’s Day with 2 out of her 3 daughters. Wish I was there, too.

Have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

[Photo by Saketh Garuda on Unsplash]

MOJO probiotic tonic

Product review: MOJO probiotic tonic

MOJO probiotic tonic is the newest member of the MOJO probiotic beverage family. They are marketed as a low sugar probiotic alternative to soft drinks.

What are probiotics

Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that normally live in our gut. Among other things, they help break down food components, produce short chain fatty acids and keep our immune system in good shape. Fermented foods and beverages that have not been pasteurised contain probiotics. There is debate regarding whether or not the probiotics in the food actually make it to our intestines after the food has been digested. Some people are of the opinion that once the probiotics get into our bodies, they might communicate at a chemical level with our immune system. Whatever the case, foods containing probiotics seem to be harmless or beneficial for most people, provided they don’t also contain a ton of junk.

What is in MOJO probiotic tonic?

The ingredients are: water, organic coconut water, organic vegan starter culture, organic apple cider vinegar, organic raw sugar, organic tea leaves, plus fruit juice, natural flavours and/or extracts, depending on the flavour.

The flavours currently available are cola, pineapple and coconut, and berry fusion. I’ve tried cola and berry fusion and they’re both good.

Mojo probiotic tonic

MOJO probiotic tonic vs MOJO kombucha

Kombucha is basically fermented tea. The tea is sweetened to feed the SCOBY (symbiotic community of bacteria and yeast, i.e. the bugs doing the fermentation) so most of the sugar is consumed by the time you drink it. I’m not sure whether this means the sugar content on the label is not necessarily accurate, but judging from labels alone, the tonics are lower in energy, carbs and sugar. See below for a comparison between a serve (330mL) of kombucha in original flavour and tonic in berry flavour:

  • Energy: 281kJ (67Cal) vs 123kJ (29 Cal)
  • Carbs: 13.2g vs 5.5g
  • Sugar: 9.4g vs 5.4g

The probiotic content is the same for both: Bacillus Coagulans GBI-30 6086 – 1 billion organisms.

The kombucha comes in more flavours: original, ginger, lemon citrus, passionfruit, raspberry, blueberry and ginger, turmeric with carrot + ginger, and strawberry hibiscus.

Want to know more?

Head to MOJO’s website and/or buy a bottle and see how you like it. They’re available in most supermarkets, health food shops, and some cafes.

Also check out the following recipe and reviews of other probiotic drinks:

caffeine metabolism

Genes and caffeine metabolism

Perhaps it’s not news to you that genes affect caffeine metabolism. It makes intuitive sense as we all know that person who can have coffee right before going to bed and still sleep like a baby.

A little while ago I got an email announcing a new report derived from my myDNA genetic testing.

Which caffeine metabolism genes are tested?

myDNA analyses three genes (ADORA2A, CYP1A1-CYP1A2, CYP1A2 and AHR) to derive information about caffeine effect on the brain, caffeine metabolism and whether inducers (foods that boost caffeine metabolism) help or not.

My reaction to caffeine

I know from experience that whenever I drink coffee in the afternoon, my sleep suffers. Falling asleep might or might not be a problem, but my sleep quality is crap. I wake up multiple times during the night and usually find it hard to go back to sleep. Therefore, as a general rule, I usually have one cup of coffee between 8 and 9am and then switch to tea.

What do my genes say?

I was pleased to learn that, looking at the big picture, my genetic testing proved to be very accurate:

  • My caffeine metabolism is normal (~45 minutes to process caffeine)
  • I’m unlikely to get anxious from moderate caffeine consumption (<4 cups of coffee per day)
  • The effects of caffeine should last 6-8 hours in my body
  • I have high likelyhood of sleep disturbance if drinking > 4 cups of coffee
  • Inducers (such as cruciferous vegetables, tobacco smoke, certain drugs, charcoal-grilled meat) do nothing to boost caffeine metabolism in my case

The takeaway is that my last cup of coffee should be about 8-12 hours before going to bed, which is exactly what I know from experience.

Bottom line

The way our bodies metabolise particular substances, including caffeine, is highly individual. You don’t need to run genetic testing to find out how you react to caffeine, you can find out by observing how you react to different levels and timing of intake.

Want to know more?

If you are curious about what your genes say, you can invest in genetic testing by companies such as myDNA. The report will also tell you the percentage of the population that shares your alleles (e.g. your particular variation of the tested genes), how many kilojoules/calories, fat and sugar are in different types of coffees and the caffeine content in different beverages. You will also find the scientific evidence behind the analysis and recommendations.

Finally, the folks at Examine.com have also recently released an article entitled Caffeine consumption: how much is safe?. Note that these are general recommendations and don’t take into account individual variations. They include caffeine content for popular drinks, too. Worth a read.

YoPRO

Product review: YoPRO high protein yoghurt

YoPRO is one of the latest additions to the ever-growing yoghurt section of most supermarkets. As I mentioned in my Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter review, at the moment many consumers are looking for high protein products to suit their lifestyles. While all yoghurts are a source of complete protein, YoPRO’s selling point is the high content of protein per serve (15g-17g) achieved by the straining step during production.

Yopro

What’s in YoPRO?

Apart from milk and live yoghurt cultures, YoPRO also contains lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose), making it suitable for people with lactose intolerance. All the fruit flavours (mango, passionfruit, strawberry, blueberry) contain actual fruit purée and all flavours (except for plain) are lightly sweetened with stevia. There are a few more ingredients in the flavoured varieties but nothing nasty as you can see in below (for the flavours I tried):

  • Plain: fresh milk, enzyme (lactase), live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus)
  • Vanilla: fresh milk, water, rice starch, enzyme (lactase), lemon pulp, natural flavours, live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus), stevia leaf extract, vanilla bean (0.012%), sea salt, natural colour (caramel), milk minerals
  • Passionfruit: fresh milk, passion fruit purée (5%), rice starch, enzyme (lactase), milk minerals, live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus), natural flavours, stevia leaf extract, sea salt
  • Blueberry: fresh milk, blueberry purée (5%), rice starch, enzyme (lactase), black carrot and blackcurrant concentrate, lemon pulp, live yoghurt cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus), stevia leaf extract, natural flavours, milk minerals, sea salt

And these are the nutritional panels (for the flavours I tried):

Plain:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 99 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 64mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 6.7g 2%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.7g
Protein 17g 34%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Vanilla:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 95 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 66mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 7.4g 2%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.1g
Protein 15.2g 30%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Passionfruit:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 96 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 67mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 7.5g 3%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.6g
Protein 15.4g 31%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Blueberry:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 160g
Servings Per Container 1

Amount Per Serving
Calories 97 Calories from Fat 2.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.3g 0%
Saturated Fat 0.2g 1%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 66mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 8.0g 3%
Dietary Fiber g 0%
Sugars 6.9g
Protein 15.2g 30%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

As you may know, yoghurt’s nutritional contributions also include calcium and probiotics. You can find more information about the health benefits of dairy in this article I wrote a while ago.

What about the taste and texture?

The reason YoPRO is high in protein is that it is strained further than other yoghurts, which results in a thicker, creamier product. Not as thick and creamy as our favourite yoghurt, but close enough.

Taste-wise, if you’re used to the sugary desserts labelled as “yoghurt”, you will probably find YoPRO’s flavour too mild. If, on the other hand, you regularly consume unsweetened plain yoghurt (i.e. real yoghurt), there’s a good chance you enjoy YoPRO in its plain and flavoured versions.

For more information head to YoPRO’s website.

carnivore diet

The carnivore diet (a.k.a. all meat diet)

If you’ve been paying attention to the nutrition world lately, you’d have heard of the carnivore diet (a.k.a. all meat diet). The baton holder at the moment is Dr Shawn Baker, an US orthopaedic surgeon and accomplished athlete. Dr Baker sells his fitness and nutrition plan at his website

The all meat diet seems to be popular with Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs/biohackers. The reason? My guess is that this is the crowd that seems to jump on the new trends, no matter what they are. Second, this is a male-dominated industry and meat (particularly red meat) continues to be a very “manly” thing to do in people’s minds.

What can you eat in the carnivore diet?

As outlined by Dr Baker, you can eat any meat, fish, butter, eggs, cream plus some other dairy products. I realised I had actually done the carnivore diet back in the early 90s (it was called “la dieta de las grasas” or “the fat diet” in the magazine I found it). I remember it being more enjoyable than the typical low-fat diets but my gall bladder/liver didn’t cope well with the switch. I might have done it for a week or so and then abandoned it.

Is the carnivore diet healthy?

Nutrition science has studied tribes like the Massai of central and southern Kenya and northern Tanzania and the Inuit of the Arctic regions of Greenland, Canada and Alaska. People from these and other tribes are the original low-carbers and they have been found to be free(er) of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, etc.

So does that mean that we should mimic their diets in order to be healthy? Well, not necessarily, unless you have a similar ethnic background, participate in similar daily life activities (such as hunting, gathering, herding, etc.) and live in a similar environment (this includes same latitude or distance from the Equator). If you don’t tick all the boxes, I’m afraid you cannot tell this diet will be the silver bullet for you.

Will the carnivore kill me?

As said above, it’s impossible to say. There are clearly many people following an all meat diet who haven’t dropped dead and are, in fact, thriving.

It is important to note that individual requirements and tolerances vary from person to person. Some people are very resilient and can live on a diet of cigarettes, chips and Coke. This doesn’t mean this is a healthy option for most of us.

Having said that, governments and nutrition professionals are compelled to advocate for diets that are likely to benefit most of the population. This means, among other things, 5+ serves of vegetables per day and a wide variety of foods of plant and animal origin.

Pros of the carnivore diet

  • Good for people who like meat/fish/eggs/dairy and don’t care about vegetables
  • Good for people who suffer from decision fatigue and are happy to eat a limited variety of foods
  • This diet is likely to provide essential nutrients such as vitamins B12 and vitamin K (MK-4 form), as well as highly available complete protein, iron, zinc and calcium. Also omega-3 if fatty fish and/or grass-fed meat and/or enriched eggs are consumed.
  • There are a number of people following a carnivore diet that have reported improved body composition and athletic performance, including Dr Baker himself. I have also heard Dr Baker speak about improvements in a number of health markers, including testosterone levels and blood lipid composition (modest increase in HDL and decrease in triglycerides; no change in total cholesterol). This is, of course, anecdotal evidence that needs to be taken with a grain of salt.

Cons of the carnivore diet

  • Lack of variety, not only taste-wise, but also nutrient-wise. A diet that excludes vegetables, fruits and other plant foods lacks important nutrients such as fibre and phytochemicals that are likely to play an important role in the prevention of chronic disease. A varied diet also ensures a more widespread exposure to potential food toxins.
  • Low sustainability (i.e. ability to follow it for life)
  • Low environmental sustainability
  • High cost if quality is a concern (and, in my opinion, it should be)
  • Difficulty navigating social situations
  • Potential issues for people with gall bladder/kidney issues or more rare nitrogen metabolism disorders

What if you want to give it a try?

You are free to do whatever you want but it would be a good idea to talk to your dietitian and/or physician (particularly if you suffer from a health condition) beforehand.

Please don’t expect to become as ripped or athletically accomplished as Dr Baker or any other carnivore ambassador. There are more things than just diet that play a role in body composition, athletic performance and health.

[Photo by Lukas Budimaier on Unsplash]

Recipe: Anzac biscuits with protein

It’s that time of the year again, that time in between hot cross buns and Christmas pudding. That time when supermarkets display piles of tins of Anzac biscuits.

This is a variation of the recipe I shared last year: better (gluten-free) Anzac biscuits. As the previous recipe, it uses uncontaminated oats, which should be safe for people with gluten allergy/intolerance. You may also use other brands, such as Bob’s Red Mill, but keep in mind international standards for gluten-free products are less strict than Australian.

Uncontaminated oats

This recipe also uses a whey protein based product called 180 Nutrition Grass-fed Protein Superfood, which contains whey protein isolate, seeds, nut flour, coconut flour, psyllium husks and stevia. I’m pretty sure True Protein raw coconut WPC or WPI would work well, too.

Anzac protein biscuits

  • Servings: 9-10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print



Ingredients

  • 1 cup uncontaminated/gluten-free rolled oats (see recommendations above)
  • 80g (about 3/4 cup) coconut protein powder (see recommendations above)
  • 1/3 cup coconut flakes or 1/4 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 75g butter
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 160°C fan-forced (180°C regular).
  2. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  3. Mix dry ingredients in bowl.
  4. Melt butter and add to bowl. Add water and maple syrup, mix well with your hands.
  5. Form golf-sized balls and flatten between your hands. Place on baking tray.
  6. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until golden brown.
  7. Let cookies cool down and enjoy.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 41.3g
Servings Per Container 9

Amount Per Serving
Calories 186.1 Calories from Fat 122.4
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 13.6g 21%
Saturated Fat 9.2g 46%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 73.9mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 8.8g 3%
Dietary Fiber 3.1g 12%
Sugars 2.4g
Protein 6.8g 14%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Recipe: Savoury bliss balls

Savoury bliss balls are my kind of healthy treat. Even though I like looking at sweet treats such as brownies, cakes and regular bliss balls, I rarely want to eat them. I prefer savoury snacks most of the time.

In case you don’t know, bliss balls are those golf-sized balls you see at counters in cafes and in the health food aisles in supermarkets (e.g. Bounce balls). They’re typically made with nuts and/or seeds, some sort of sweetener (e.g. honey, maple syrup, dates) and some sort of flavouring (e.g. cacao powder, matcha, vanilla extract, spices). Some incorporate protein powder and/or collagen to be treated as a post-workout snack. They can be vegan, dairy-free, gluten-free, etc.

But nobody out there makes savoury bliss balls! That’s why I decided to experiment with a few ingredients I thought would make great balls, texture and flavour-wise.

One of the main ingredients is hemp protein powder, which bumps up the protein content and makes the balls vegan, high-protein and low-carb. I used a Hemple sample I had lying around (pictured below), but you could use any neutral-flavoured protein powder instead.

Hemple hemp protein

Hemple hemp protein

These balls are great at room temperature, chilled or frozen (my personal favourite). Enjoy!

Savoury bliss balls

  • Servings: about 15
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print



Ingredients


Directions

  1. Mix all ingredients in bowl with a spoon or spatula.
  2. Form balls.
  3. Eat.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 12.4g
Servings Per Container 15

Amount Per Serving
Calories 54.2 Calories from Fat 38.7
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4.3g 7%
Saturated Fat 1.0g 5%
Trans Fat 0.0g
Cholesterol 0.3mg 0%
Sodium 20.5mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 1.9g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1.6g 6%
Sugars 0.5g
Protein 2.6g 5%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter

Product review: Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter

Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter is the new awesome spread from the makers of awesome spreads. Their regular peanut butters (smooth, crunchy, dark roasted smooth and dark roasted crunchy) are among my favourites, as well as their other spreads. Yes, they can be a bit more expensive than other peanut butters but they tick all the boxes ingredients- and taste-wise.

The new Protein+ range has entered the market riding the wave of high protein diets popularity. The three varieties, Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter, Mayver’s Protein+ with Hemp Seeds Peanut Butter, and Mayver’s Protein+ with Super Seeds Peanut Butter, follow the brand’s philosophy of minimal ingredients lists, without any added oil or sugar.

Where does the Protein+ come from?

The three flavours have added peanut flour to achieve extra protein without added fat, plus seeds in the case of the hemp and super seeds varieties. Check out the ingredients lists below:

Mayvers protein peanut butter

  • Natural: roasted peanuts, peanut flour & salt
  • Hemp: peanuts, peanut flour, hemp seeds (5%) & salt
  • Super Seeds: peanuts, peanut flour, (chia seeds, linseeds, sunflower seeds, pepitas, quinoa) (5%) & salt

And these are the nutritional panels:

Natural:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 20g
Servings Per Container 19

Amount Per Serving
Calories 97.1 Calories from Fat 75.6
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8.4g 13%
Saturated Fat 1.1g 6%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 79mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 2.6g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1.8g 7%
Sugars 1.4g
Protein 6.4g 13%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Hemp:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 20g
Servings Per Container 19

Amount Per Serving
Calories 97.5 Calories from Fat 76.5
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8.5g 13%
Saturated Fat 1.1g 6%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 75mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 3.2g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1.8g 7%
Sugars 1.2g
Protein 6.4g 13%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Super seeds:

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 20g
Servings Per Container 19

Amount Per Serving
Calories 96.7 Calories from Fat 75.6
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8.4g 13%
Saturated Fat 1.0g 5%
Trans Fat g
Cholesterol mg 0%
Sodium 75mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate 2.7g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1.9g 8%
Sugars 1.3g
Protein 6.4g 13%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

What about the taste and texture?

Taste-wise my favourite is the natural flavour, followed by the super seeds, followed by the hemp. Nothing wrong with any of the flavours, it’s just a matter of personal preference.

While not super thick, these peanut butters are definitely on the thicker side and the mouthfeel can be a bit gritty, particularly in the natural flavour. If smooth silky peanut butter is your thing, stick to the regular smooth options.

Can I use this peanut butter in recipes?

Absolutely. I made a test batch (recipe coming soon) of bliss balls with the natural PB and it worked perfectly.

You can find more information in the following links:
Mayver’s Protein+ Peanut Butter
Mayver’s Protein+ with Hemp Seeds Peanut Butter
Mayver’s Protein+ with Super Seeds Peanut Butter

Recipe: 2-ingredient devilled eggs

Devilled eggs are one of those foods that look very retro but come and go in waves. According to Wikipedia, they date back to ancient Rome (!)

Devilled eggs are hard-boiled eggs that are cut in half. The yolks are mixed with binding agents such as mayonnaise and placed back into the egg white cavities. They are mostly a party food but are also wonderful for picnics, as a snack or as part of a meal when paired with veggies.

If you can get your hands on good quality spicy mayonnaise (such as Primal Kitchen chipotle lime mayo), you only need a couple of ingredients to make magic happen. This recipe is gluten-free, dairy-free, ovo-lacto-vegetarian, paleo, primal, low-carb and keto. Enjoy!

2-ingredient devilled eggs

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print



Ingredients


Directions

  1. Steam eggs for 10 minutes. Cool down under cold running water. Place them in a bowl of cold water until they have cooled down completely (about 10 minutes).
  2. Peel eggs and split in half.
  3. Scoop out yolks and place in a bowl.
  4. Mash yolks with a fork, mix with mayonnaise.
  5. Pipe or spoon yolk mix back into egg halves.
  6. Serve in a platter.