Product review: Pili nuts

I first heard about pili nuts a couple of years ago. These nuts hail from the Philippines and are particularly sought after by people following a low-carb or keto diet, due to its high content of fat and low content of carbohydrate. They’re pretty hard to come by, especially in Australia. Luckily for me, a teammate recently went to the Philippines and brought me a bag of plain roasted ones (she knows me well).

Pili nuts

The nuts look like giant almond slivers and have a soft, buttery and crumbly texture. They are very mild in flavour so you might want to shake some sea salt on them before trying them.

The table below shows nutrition information for most nuts (raw, from the Australian food nutrient database) and pili nuts (dry roasted, from the package and dried, from the USDA database).

Food Name Energy, with dietary fibre (kJ)

Protein (g)

Total fat (g)

Carbohydrate (g)

Total sugars (g)

Dietary fibre (g)
Almonds 2578 21 55.6 6.4 3.9 7.4
Brazil nuts 2886 14.4 68.5 2.4 2.1 8.5
Cashews 2544 17 49.2 23.1 5.5 5.9
Chestnuts 731 2.5 0.7 32.1 3.3 14.9
Hazelnuts 2689 14.8 61.4 5.1 4.4 10.4
Macadamias 3018 9.2 74 4.5 4.5 6.4
Peanuts 2376 24.7 47.1 8.9 5.1 8.2
Pecan 2973 9.8 71.9 4.9 4.3 8.4
Pili nuts Package: 3068
USDA: 3008
13.3
10.8
70.0
79.6
10.0
4.0
0
N/A
0
N/A
Pine nuts 2925 13 70 4.5 3.4 5.1
Pistachios 2542 19.7 50.6 15.8 5.9 9
Walnuts 2904 14.4 69.2 3 2.7 6.4

Not on the table, but pili nuts do seem to contain a decent amount of calcium and monounsaturated fats (compared to other nuts). If you have easy access to plain, dry roasted pili nuts, give them a go, they might be your cup of tea.

Pili nuts

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